Caracals are coming back!

Hello folks,

My post today is to tell you I am going to start trapping caracals again, now that Quinton is back from the US.

This morning, I spotted my first caracal in the wild in the Cederberg Mountains. The cat was walking in a vlei, its big black ears pricked up, vigilant to the surrounding noises. It was so beautiful! I wish I could have taken a picture before it disappeared in the reed bed.

Other good news: I got a picture of one of our collared male caracal on one of The Cape Leopard Trust remote cameras. He seems very fine as you can see.  I also would like to share with you some pictures of other wildlife living on the same area as caracals. They are all nocturnal and difficult to see, that’s why the use of remote cameras is so important. As you can see, our collared male has a neighbor, maybe a female? If we could collar this other caracal, we could then look at their potential interaction and territory overlapping… A great person reminded me recently that “if we can dream it we can do it”!

One of our collared male caracal (Caracal caracal), active 30 minutes after midnight

Another caracal (Caracal caracal) – maybe a female? – that I would love to fit with a GPS radio collar, to learn about intraspecific interactions

A young African wildcat (Felis sylvestris lybica)

The aardwolf (Proteles cristata)

A member of the Canidae family, the Cape fox (Vulpes chama)

A bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis)

Last thing, on June, 27th, 28th and 29th, I will be with Anita from the Boland Leopard Project in Bushmans Kloof again. We will speak about leopards and conservation, and track Easter and her youngster.  Come and join us!

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Categories: Uncategorized | 3 Comments

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3 thoughts on “Caracals are coming back!

  1. Hi Marine, these are really nice pics … and a diverse bunch to get from one camtrap.

  2. Just a note – at around midday, on the table Mountain Road, to Rhodes Memorial, last Tuesday 19th June 2012, I was slowly heading towards the Memorial, as a large Caracal, emerged about 6 meters, mountainside, walked parallel to the road, for another 10 meters, then crossed the road, to go through the UCT fence, below the road and disappear into the University grounds.

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